Miscellaneous Debris

Just a guy who likes a lot stuff, who does a lot things which make him happy. You can find most of them here...
Recent Tweets @Mrcozdude
Posts I Like
Who I Follow

Glasses chronicles part 3

Best preface to a book ever. #breakfastofchampions

shitfuckingfuckshit:

Victorian Cliff House, San Francisco

(via oldfilmsflicker)

digg:

HOLY SHIT

NO

(via Telegraph)

savetheflower-1967:

Mick Jagger & Paul McCartney, 1967.

nitratediva:

Harold Lloyd discovers that his disguise is less than foolproof in Now or Never (1921).

nitratediva:

Harold Lloyd discovers that his disguise is less than foolproof in Now or Never (1921).

musician-photos:

Slam Stewart, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1946 (photo by William P. Gottlieb)

dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.

As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war).

But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history.

It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale.

From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world.

World War I in Africa.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

Akira Kurosawa’s painted storyboards — Dreams (1990)

wehadfacesthen:

Richard Attenborough in In Which We Serve  (Noel Coward, 1942)

Lord Attenborough died today. May his beautiful soul rest in peace.