Miscellaneous Debris

Just a guy who likes a lot stuff, who does a lot things which make him happy. You can find most of them here...
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shitfuckingfuckshit:

Victorian Cliff House, San Francisco

(via oldfilmsflicker)

digg:

HOLY SHIT

NO

(via Telegraph)

savetheflower-1967:

Mick Jagger & Paul McCartney, 1967.

nitratediva:

Harold Lloyd discovers that his disguise is less than foolproof in Now or Never (1921).

nitratediva:

Harold Lloyd discovers that his disguise is less than foolproof in Now or Never (1921).

musician-photos:

Slam Stewart, New York, N.Y., ca. Sept. 1946 (photo by William P. Gottlieb)

dynamicafrica:

The World War I in Africa Project Sheds Light On An Often Forgotten Part of History.

As a student of history for all my years of secondary education, I can’t say that I never learned about World War I, the events leading up to it as well as the aftermath it had on Europe and to some extent the United States. Perhaps we never delved into it in quite as much depth as we did World War II, but even then, I’d be hard-pressed to think of time where my history teacher (bless her soul) ever mentioned the impact that the First World War had on Africa and Africans. Such a truth wouldn’t concern me if the circumstances were different; if I wasn’t at a school in an African country, if I weren’t an African myself, if I wasn’t one of five black students in a history class of over 20, if I didn’t come from a country that was colonized by the British (who, as history goes, love war).

But all these things were and still are a part of who I am, and it is for these reasons – and so many more, that the World War I in Africa project is incredibly important learning for me. Even beyond the personal connection of history and heritage, the ignorance of many to the involvement of Africans in World War I and the integral roles the played speak to a much broader concern of the omission and reduction of black people and Africans in many important events in Western history.

It’s been 100 years since the First World War began. 100 years since the first shot fired by British troops occurred in what is today known as Togo, on August 7th, 1914. 100 years gone by and still, the world is yet to actively include and universally commemorate the lives of the estimated two million Africans who in some way contributed to the efforts of their colonial empires during this bitter war of the 1910s. World War I was indeed what its title refers to it as – a war that saw involvement on a global scale.

From the Gold Coast to German East Africa, Algeria to the southernmost tip of Africa, a new initiative is bringing to light the forgotten ways in which European politics brought the Great War to African homes. Through the efforts of World War I in Africa project, we are provided with a multimedia database that both highlights and archives the ways in which African lives were affected by a war they had no agency in. Because what happens in Africa should be told around the world.

World War I in Africa.

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Akira Kurosawa’s painted storyboards — Dreams (1990)

wehadfacesthen:

Richard Attenborough in In Which We Serve  (Noel Coward, 1942)

Lord Attenborough died today. May his beautiful soul rest in peace.

Love this man

i didn’t ask to get made! i didn’t ask to be torn apart and put back together over and over and turned into some little monster!

cinephiliabeyond:

The Adventures of Baron Munchausen, a 1988 brilliant classic by Terry Gilliam, explores the mystical travels of the Baron and his friends. On-set photography by Peter Marlow/Magnum Photos, courtesy of Kinoimages.

Here’s a rarity: Terry Gilliam’s out-of-print Criterion LaserDisc commentary for The Adventures of Baron Munchausen (as always; for educational purposes only). A different commentary track is available on the 20th Anniversary Edition DVD/Blu-ray (Amazon).

I hear people talking about Munchausen now, saying it’s epoch-making or something, and they mean the special effects. I mean, of course people and little cherubs dance in the sky! Those things exist in paintings — they’ve always been there and I don’t understand why people are so amazed. There’s a strange leap happens when something goes up on screen and it seems different than when they see it on a painting or in a book or read about it. I was looking at these Medieval paintings the other day and everybody’s floating in the air and there are those marvellous angels and these strange banners that twirl up and round with the dialogue written on them! If you put anything like that in film it’s a very very pale imitation. I’m always disappointed it’s not as good as the painting. Yet people seem to be surprised by it!

What bothers me is that audiences aren’t educated any more into seeing these things. They become visually illiterate and when you put things up there they ooh! And aah! Far more that they ought to. You’re trying to make beautiful images, but they’re not supposed to dominate the thing, they’re just supposed to be the vocabulary within which the story is told. It seems to be accepted in animation. I think we’ve all gotten caught in this world of naturalism being the truth and naturalism isn’t any more truthful that the stuff I do or the stuff Tex Avery does. I mean it’s all artifice.

British cinema used to be visually amazing. Carol Reed, David Lean, Powell and Pressburger — these are really strong visual artists! And then it disappeared, got lost somewhere and we went theatrical; but the side of theatre that isn’t really theatre, it’s the Angry Young Man-type of theatre. But at least it’s visual! Ridley (Scott) and that mob are basically commercially oriented. I find the shots so beautiful and yet… maybe they’re just too close to commercials and they have no real substance other than their own beauty. Greenaway’s stuff I wish I could sit through because every time I see clips, stills — I love ‘em. Then I watch the film and I lose interest in the thing — because I don’t think he likes people, and he’s got a real problem there because ultimately they’re rather important! —Terry Gilliam, The Face Interview

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guardianmusic:

HAPPY KATE BUSH WEEK, EVERYBODY
Now that the only likeable manic pixie dream girl in the history of the world is playing live for the first time in 35 years, expect a lot of our music coverage to centre around her return. Just for a couple of days, mind.
If you weren’t lucky enough to nab tickets to her series of shows, live vicariously through Alexis Petridis’ five-star review (and Harriet GIbsone’s liveblog from night one, yesterday).

guardianmusic:

HAPPY KATE BUSH WEEK, EVERYBODY

Now that the only likeable manic pixie dream girl in the history of the world is playing live for the first time in 35 years, expect a lot of our music coverage to centre around her return. Just for a couple of days, mind.

If you weren’t lucky enough to nab tickets to her series of shows, live vicariously through Alexis Petridis’ five-star review (and Harriet GIbsone’s liveblog from night one, yesterday).

geek-art:

#geekart I am the Law ! Cops art show Hero Complex Gallery ! My selection here… http://www.geek-art.net/i-am-the-law-life-of-crime-art-show-bottleneck-gallery/